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Not Just An Inspection, But An Education.

Whether you’re buying or selling, you’ll want to hire an InterNACHI-Certified Professional Inspector to look at your property. As a member of the InterNACHI-Certified Commercial Property Inspection Association and International Association of Certified Home Inspectors, I represent the best-trained and most highly qualified inspectors in the business. Please call 520.907.9335 for a quote.

We Inspect

  • Heating Systems
  • Insulation
  • Interior Home
  • Plumbing Systems
  • Roofs
  • Structural
  • Walls
  • Windows
  • Furnaces
  • Attics
  • Basement & Crawlspaces
  • Ceilings
  • AC Systems
  • Doors
  • Electrical Systems
  • Exterior Home
  • Floors
  • Foundations
  • Fireplaces
  • Pools
  • Commercial Buildings

We provide thorough inspections on several types of properties including:

  • Condominiums
  • Town Houses
  • Homes
  • New Construction
  • Rentals (Apartments & Homes)
  • Manufactured Homes
  • Mobile Homes
  • Churches

1. Pre-Listing Inspections

Having your home inspected before you list is recommended. Eventually your buyers are going to conduct an inspection. You may as well know what they are going to find by getting an inspection first. Here are some benefits of a pre-listing inspection:

  • Allows you to see your home through the eyes of an unbiased third-party
  • Helps you to price your home realistically
  • Permits you to make repairs ahead of time
  • Defects won't become negotiating stumbling blocks later
  • You have the time to get the repairs corrected
  • May encourage the buyer to waive the inspection contingency
  • May relieve buyers concerns and suspicions
  • Alerts you to immediate safety issues before agents and visitors tour your home

Copies of the inspection report along with receipts for any repairs should be made available to potential buyers.

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2. Listing/Buying Inspections

Getting ready to buy a house? You’ve probably got a lot on your mind, especially when it comes to money. Taxes, closing costs, interest rates–these can all mean less cash in your pocket. So you probably don’t want to think about yet another expense, particularly before you even purchase the house.

But what if you could invest a few hundred dollars and save thousands in return? Ahhhh. Now that might be different.

The fact is, a home inspection on the house you’re thinking of purchasing could reveal problems you never would have noticed–problems that you could require the seller to address before you purchase the house, or maybe even problems that make you change your mind altogether about buying the house.

3. New Construction Inspections

It is important to realize that most new homes have defects that are not easily spotted. Many builders cannot follow every sub-contractor every step of the way. The final walk through with the builder, is mainly for aesthetics and not a detailed inspection.

New construction inspections can be completed in three phases:

  • Pre-Drywall — we will inspect the electric, plumbing, insulation, and framing before the drywall goes up.
  • Pre-Closing — we will come in a few days before you close and do a full inspection. This gives the builder a few days to correct everything we find before your closing day.
  • 11-month Warranty Inspection — we will come back out and do another full inspection before your twelve months warranty is up. Defects that were hidden prior to the closing of the property may manifest themselves once the home is exposed to climate changes over the course of a few months. Also, if a certified inspection was not completed at closing, now is the perfect time to locate defects before the warranty period ends.

You can choose 1, 2 or all 3 of the inspections when you are building a new home.

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4. Thermal Image Inspections

Whether you’re buying or selling, you’ll want to hire an InterNACHI-Certified Professional Inspector to look at your property. As a member of the InterNACHI-Certified Commercial Property Inspection Association and International Association of Certified Home Inspectors, I represent the best-trained and most highly qualified inspectors in the business.

Finding An Inspector

A typical home inspection covers all major mechanical systems, structural integrity, cosmetic features and other aspects of the house. So how can anyone inspector have expertise on so many different things? The simple answer is: some don’t. That’s why it’s important to check an inspector’s background and references before you hire one.

When you’re looking for an inspector, a good place to start is with friends and family–they might have some recommendations. After you’ve found a prospective inspector, it’s a good idea to do some checking on your own. Some of the key things you should ask about include their background, the length of time they’ve been in the business, and what sort of report they’ll provide.

On the day of the inspection, the inspector will perform an initial site evaluation. Then the inspector should take you on a tour to point out the assets as well as any potential problems you might face with the house. At the end of the inspection you should receive a report detailing all the findings.

You will be asked to absorb a lot of information in a short time. This often includes the

inspection report, photographs, termite report, and what the inspector himself says during the inspection. All this combined with the seller’s disclosure and what you notice yourself makes the experience even more overwhelming.

Relax, the issues that really matter will fall into four categories:

  • Major defects — An example of this would be a structural failure.
  • Things that lead to major defects; such as a small roof-flashing leak.
  • Things that may hinder your ability to finance, legally occupy, or insure the home.
  • Safety hazard — An example of this would be an exposed, live buss bar at the electric panel.

Anything in these categories should be addressed. Often a serious problem can be corrected inexpensively to protect both life and property. Most sellers are honest and are often surprised to learn of defects uncovered during an inspection. Realize that sellers are under no obligation to repair everything mentioned in the report. No home is perfect. Keep things in perspective, and don’t kill your deal over things that don’t matter. It is inappropriate to demand that a seller address small maintenance items, or conditions already listed on the seller’s disclosure form.

Feel free to call me with any questions. 520.907.9335 Even if you are not using my company but have an inspection question, I will be more than glad to help you out.

Office Location

Serving all of Southern Arizona

Email

mtimpani@az.nachi.org

PHONE

(520) 907-9335

Open Hours

M-S: 7am -8pm

Start with A Free Quote For Your Project

or call Now: (520) 907-9335